News

Vinge focuses on a China Practice Group based in Sweden

November 20, 2014

Vinge has taken the strategic decision to concentrate its China Practice to nine lawyers, all of whom are based in Sweden and who will be led by Gu Qun who holds an LL B from the East China University of Political Science & Law.

She has, among other things, previously worked as a judge at a district court in Jiangsu Province and as corporate counsel at Norsk Hydro in China. Since 2012, Qun Gu has managed the China operations from Vinge’s Stockholm office where she is based.

It is possible to have a China Practice Group which is based in Sweden due to the good relations with several leading Chinese corporate law firms, which accords with Vinge’s general international strategy. In addition, Vinge is a member of Lex Mundi, a worldwide international network of independent corporate law firms in which Jun He is a member firm in China.

The decision means that Vinge’s office in Shanghai will close during the first quarter of 2015. The Chinese lawyers working at this office have been offered employment by one of Vinge’s co-operating partners. Katarina Nilsson, who is currently the Resident Partner at the Shanghai office, will be leaving to take up a position as Head of Legal Asia Pacific at SAPA.       

The Swedish rules on cabotage transport and posting will change on 2 and 21 February 2022

The Swedish government has decided on a number of new rules concerning cabotage transports, combined transports, transport customer responsibility for driving and rest times and posting of workers.
January 21, 2022

Vinge presents the Swedish chapter for the 2022 version of The Legal 500: Private Equity Country Comparative Guide

The guide provides an overview of the Swedish Private Equity market and the salient legislation in connection with PE transactions in Sweden.
January 11, 2022

The prohibition imposed by EU law on complying with secondary sanctions laid down by the United States against Iran may be relied on in civil proceedings

On Tuesday 21 December, the EU Court of Justice delivered its long-awaited judgment in the Bank Melli Iran case (Case C-124/20) on the interpretation of the EU Blocking Statute regarding compliance with third country sanctions. According to the Court, the prohibition imposed by EU law on complying with secondary sanctions laid down by the United States against Iran may be relied on in civil proceedings. Following the Court’s judgment, anyone seeking to terminate a contract with a person or business subject to US sanctions must thoroughly consider if the termination is motivated by other reasons than the existing sanctions and reflect on whether to apply to the Commission for a derogation from the Blocking Statute.
December 23, 2021