News

Large companies have poor trademark protection

June 23, 2010

More than 8 of 10 Swedish companies consider trademarks and other intellectual property rights to be important or very important for them.  Almost half have been exposed to infringement in the last five years. However, these companies spend far more money protecting stock-in-trade and machinery than their intellectual property rights.


These are the results of Vinge’s second Trademarks Survey. More companies than previously consider that the rights are important and several think that the risk of infringement has increased. Forty-eight per cent consider that the risk has significantly increased. This represents an increase of 8 percentage points since 2008.

The results of this year’s survey show however that companies spend far more money on protecting tangible assets such as premises and machinery than they do on intellectual property rights. A conservative estimate of Swedish companies with an annual turnover of at least SEK 50 million and at least 100 employees indicates that these companies spend approximately SEK 3 billion per annum on protecting tangible assets. This figure may be compared with SEK 1.15 billion expended on intangible asset protection.

“Despite the fact that intangible assets may constitute up to half and sometimes more of these companies market value, in relative terms nowhere near as much money is spent protecting these assets from infringement which in the long-term may prove to be very expensive” say Per Eric Alvsing, an intellectual property expert at Vinge.

Forty-seven per cent of the companies that participated in the survey consider that intellectual property rights are very important for them. At the same time, only 24 per cent of them say that this issue is a priority.

“It is possible that companies believe that it is difficult to acquire effective protection for trademarks and other intellectual property rights or that these issues do not get the attention they deserve within the organisation itself” says Per Eric Alvsing.

The significance of a trademark to a company’s success is appreciably greater for large companies with operations outside the Nordic region. Trademarks are considered important success factors in countries in the Middle East, China and the rest of Asia and the United States and North America. Almost 100 per cent of the companies that operate on these markets state that a trademark is a very large or fairly large success factor for them.

For further information contact:
Per Eric Alvsing, partner Vinge, + 46 8 614 30 14, mobile: + 46 70 714 30 14, email: per.eric.alvsing@vinge.se
Boo Ehlin, Head of Communications, mobile: + 46 70 429 33 87
email: boo.ehlin@vinge.se


 

New statute prohibits unfair terms and conditions and practices in conjunction with the purchase of agricultural and food products

The so-called UTP Act prohibits buyers from using certain terms and conditions and practices against suppliers of agricultural and food products. The Swedish Competition Authority exercises supervision and can, among other things, carry out unannounced inspections and order individual to attend formal interviews. In conjunction with violations, sanctions such as injunctions subject to a default fine or a sanction fee of up to one per cent of the buyer’s annual turnover can be imposed. The UTP Act will enter into force on 1 November 2021 and will also be applicable to contracts which are entered into prior to this date.
October 05, 2021

Vinge employs additional antitrust economists to further strengthen its practice

We welcome Adam Löfquist and Carl Widstrand to our EU, Competition & Regulatory practice group.
September 30, 2021

European Commission provides sanctions compliance guidance

The European Commission has recently issued three opinions regarding the interpretation of asset freeze provisions in certain sanctions legislation pertaining to Central African Republic, Ukraine, Libya and Syria. The opinions are also of relevance for other sanctions regimes which provide for the same or similar restrictions. Therefore, their practical relevance goes far beyond the sanctions regimes in the context of which they were issued and they therefore provide for helpful guidance regarding the required thresholds for sanctions compliance generally.
September 20, 2021